Adafruit screw shield with homing noise suppression easy change capacitors

Hook up your old Arduino via the USB port, bring up UGCS and enter $#

Grbl 1.0c [’$’ for help]

$#
[G54:0.000,0.000,0.000]
[G55:0.000,0.000,0.000]
[G56:0.000,0.000,0.000]
[G57:0.000,0.000,0.000]
[G58:0.000,0.000,0.000]
[G59:0.000,0.000,0.000]
[G28:0.000,0.000,0.000]
[G30:0.000,0.000,0.000]
[G92:0.000,0.000,0.000]
[TLO:0.000]
[PRB:0.000,0.000,0.000:0]
ok

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There is a maximum distance. It is based off the $130,$131, and $132 entries. There is a scale factor that is applied to those numbers and can be changed with a recompile of the source code.

No.

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Yes, that’s the way I run mine.

I could go into a big discussion of switching high currents, magnetic fields, induced voltage and induced currents, but at the end of the day the result would most likely be the same.

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If you had homed the machine with soft limits on -------- it would have helped.

Soft limits are down in the Arduino, doesn’t matter where the G-code comes from.

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Hey, we all do it sometime. I was helping someone with a G-code problem and I turned soft limits off for the test and busted up a Z axis limit switch. One in a year. Not too bad. I still keep a few switches on hand.

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There is a configuration parameter that tells grbl to report co-ordinates in negative space or positive space. Internally grbl uses negative space which is also used by many if not all of the “pro” CNC machines.

There are firmware versions that have it set one way and some that have it set the other way, but use the same .hex filename. That’s one of the reasons that I now just use the source code and build it myself if I need to re-flash the Arduino.

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Not extreme at all. Just a personal preference. Each method has its strengths and weakness.

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