Setting up CNC workshop

I’m making a shopping list what to get for my new CNC workshop. So far I came up with this list:

  • CNC machine (obviously)
  • Thickness planer
  • Miter saw
  • Table saw (?)
  • Shop vac / dust control
  • Clamps

I already have:

  • Circular saw
  • Kreg Accu-Cut

Please share your suggestions, thank you!

random orbital sander

Before the table saw, I’d consider a band saw — it won’t take up as much space, and it’ll afford the option of resawing.

To go with the planer consider a jointer to establish a reference 90 degree edge unless you’re always going to be working on stock smaller than your working area and cutting it to dimension using the machine.

If you are asking as a “screw the cost” type thing, then the list never ends lol.

I try and buy the right tools so that I never come to a point in my workflow that I’m stopped because I need to jerry rig something to get the job done.

the most important tools in MY shop are a table saw that is large enough to break down large sheets of plywood and MDF.

I chose this one…
https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.13-amp-10-in-professional-cast-iron-table-saw.1000676081.html

A large throat bandsaw,
something like this

a couple variable speed random orbital sanders

Dust collector…connect it to everything…everything
this is the one I chose

clamps, clamps and more clamps, bar clamps, bessy clamps, when in doubt more clamps

and most importantly a sense of humour, you will want to burn everything to the ground some days when nothing goes right…those days humour is your best friend

exactly, table saw can miter cut, a miter saw cannot cut large wood

I agree with the dust collector. Mine is mounted on the wall and the hose reaches all my tools.

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I have a drum sander and use it daily. It saves a whole lot of hand sanding.

When going for a bandsaw, consider wat the vertical capacity of it is as well.
A 17 inch saw may have more room between the upright, the part that helps the upper portion of the saw defy the pull of gravity, and the blade but vertical capacity may still only be 6" or so depending on the mfgr.

I run a 14" Jet with a 6" riser block in the upright giving me 12" vertical clearance and much greater resaw capacity. This come with a drawback that I also now need longer blades. 108" as opposed to the original 93.5" and they are not available to me locally. Thank goodness for Amazon!.

Getting your saw to behave and give you acceptable results is another challenge.
Check out this guy’s video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGbZqWac0jU
His method got me and my saw on the straight and narrow and he’s a heckuva nice guy too!

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Thanks for all the suggestions. Why would a bandsaw be so useful in a CNC workshop, since almost everyone mentioned it?

resawing wood that too thick for the project you intend it for…

I use it instead of tabs or tape and glue on simple shaped signs etc, carve the perimeter almost to the bottom of the board, then I use the band saw to trim off the exxess to free up the sign from the rest of the wood.

also its another way to make creative projects…look up things like bandsaw boxes on youtube

in all honesty if you need to ask random people this question, you’re probably not ready to set up a proper shop in the first place.
Start small, see what you like to make/sell and which tools you need for that. And work your way up from that depending on your needs.

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I’m glad to read that you already knew everything before you started your proper shop. And that you had a lot of woodworker friends who advised you on everything so you didn’t have ask all these random people on the internet for some tips and advice. Keep up the good work Frederico!

LoL

Good luck with your CNC workshop.

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If that’s the attitude you’re going to display here and in your business, I wish you the best of luck.

As I said, figure out what YOU want to do, and buy accordingly. Scale up when the time calls for it. Or be my guest and just spend thousands following the advice of total strangers who have no clue about you, or how you see your future workshop.

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