Any wood turners?


Just finished the website sled. Thank you very much for sharing this project. It works great.

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Very nice! looks like mine! ;). What did you fill the lettering with?

Fine point sharpie. The template in your workpieces is used for what?

I’m a woodturner, 3D printer owner, X-Carver, Festool fan, Normite, computer programmer, drone builder, electronics wannabe, and getting started with a K40 laser upgraded with a Smoothieboard. It’s kinda cool when the machines start making parts for each other. I’ve got a few things on my Thingiverse page which might be of interest to turners (25 degree setup gauge which I use for sharpening my skew), X-Carve owners (router jig useful for making waste boards, vacuum hose holder), and workshop geeks in general (wall chisel holders and zero clearance inserts). The cheap helping hands for my Panavise is my latest design. All free.

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I use that workpiece for creating the individual wedges. I duplicate that workpiece, then create a new wedge, then copy/paste that to the main wedge workpiece always keeping the template untouched.

Ok, that make sense now. Thank you

Yep! You gotta do it! There no excuse. Lol

There’s no end to this stuff. I got into woodturning and thought making bowls was fun, but then people kept insisting that I sign my bowls (argh, my handwriting sucks), so I end up buying a fancy woodburning pen, so now all the sudden I’m supposed to be in pyrography too. And as a turned of course you’ve got to sharpen your chisels, so now you into metalworking and grinding more than you ever thought you wanted to be.

Well you guys could be like me it started buying a better lathe (Oneway)… then another lathe (Stubby)… then an Xcarve… then built a new two story shop… then a sawmill … then a flat deck and 1 ton diesel truck… and finally a new two story garage and not to mention all the other bits and pieces, I am actually very surprised I am still married.

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Sharpening my lathe tools is a major weakness for me. It’s hit and miss.

They work much better with an 8" grinder than the smaller 6" ones. You get a much more accurate angle on the sharpening.

Here’s a picture of the turning/sharpening cabinets in my workshop:

I’ve got both the Tormek and Wolverine sharpening systems and for turning tools I use the Wolverine a lot more. But a few years ago I ditched the regular grinding wheel for a CBN wheel from D-Way Tools and while they cost $200 I found it worth it. There is no danger of a wheel fracture, it doesn’t heat damage the chisel, and the wheel doesn’t get smaller from use. It also runs amazingly smooth compared to a regular wheel. I only got it for my finer grit wheel and would for my coarse grit, but I don’t actually use the coarse wheel very much and the CBN wheels are only recommend for high speed steel.

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The wolverine jig isn’t complicated, but I definitely can’t sharpen a bowl gouge without it or an equivalent. I slapped this one together and added a second-hand vari-grind attachment later on (not required, nobody actually adjusts the angle). I’ve also found a WorkSharp WS2000 at a yard sale a couple summers ago, it’s nice for free handing skews and parting tools but probably not necessary either.

I don’t know why it took me so long to find this thread. I started out woodturning. Still do it every now and then. I tried to do the whole “pens at the craft shows” thing, didn’t work out so well. I really couldn’t go to many of the away shows due to work, so I sorta just fell off of turning. Now I have about 300 finished pens in my office collecting dust. I have some nice machines though and make something every now and then. Made a small vase last weekend and taught my nephew the basics of turning.

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